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August 2013

The race for summer’s end is over – some have already dropped off sons and daughters at college and said goodbyes, while others are still dealing with high school students gearing up for the first day of school. Recently, we have been flooded with calls for last minute eye exams and contact lens orders. If you missed the opportunity before the ‘official’ end of summer, no worries – we are always here to assist!

Remember to listen to your students when they return to school – if you receive constant complaints about headaches or trouble seeing the board, we would be happy to determine the cause and treat accordingly. Also, don’t forget that we are your one-stop RX Zone shop for protective eyewear to help your student athlete avoid sports injuries.

Check out our Summer Optical Special before it’s too late! Your young adults will thank you for getting them back to school in style and protected so they can play hard. It’s the best of both worlds!

On August 10th, in honor of National S’mores Day, Americans were encouraged to light a campfire, gather family and friends, and create the perfect combination of rich chocolate, melted marshmallows, and crisp graham crackers. No one can resist an ooey gooey S’more.

I joined in on the movement, and had a blast with my entire family. As I roasted marshmallows over the open flame, I found myself strangely overwhelmed by the radiant heat. Years had passed since I last made this essential summertime snack, but I certainly didn’t remember it making me feel like this. The sensation was almost unbearable. My 9 year old felt the burn as well, and had to ask me to finish toasting her marshmallow while she stood at a safe distance from the fire. This experience got me thinking of a larger question:

Can being close to fire/heat damage your eyes?
Your eyes may become red or irritated with exposure, but no long term vision issues should arise. If irritation persists, call our office to schedule a visit so you can get back to enjoying what’s left of the summer!

What precautions can I take to avoid injury?
Our doctors suggest keeping your distance, using protective eyewear or sunglasses to thwart flying or popping embers, and applying artificial tears. Contact lens wearers should remove their lenses or use protective eyewear or sunglasses if they are going to be close to a fire/heat source for an extended period of time. Remember, if irritation persists, please give us a call and schedule a visit!

Don’t let fire and heat exposure stop you from doing what you love to do! Get out there and enjoy the last days of summer. Happy grilling!

Take a lesson from CNN news anchor Anderson Cooper’s brush with 36 hours of temporary blindness: avoid overexposure to the sun. You may not think the sun is emitting damaging rays on cloudy days, but its strength does not discriminate. The sun will find any exposed area and lay claim to it – including your eyes.

Anderson Cooper’s 3 days of pain and discomfort were a result of photokeratitis – a condition like sunburn in the eyes. Mild photokeratitis can feel as if there is grit stuck in the eyes – a sensation caused by layers of the cornea peeling following the sunburn. Those with extreme cases describe the condition as feeling as if their eyeballs are on fire.

In Anderson Cooper’s case, the sun reflected off of water – and UV exposure can increase 25% when rays are scattered and reflected off of a reflective surface. Remember this when you are enjoying watersports this summer, or even just lounging in the pool or ocean – and always use sunglass protection. We have a large selection of designer sunglasses in our full-service Optical Shop – check out our new sunglass Optical Special!

If you experience overexposure to the sun and your eyes get sunburn, call our team at 732-774-5566 to get on the track to recovery.

Changes in hormones, metabolism, fluid retention, and blood circulation can all affect your eyesight during pregnancy. Water retention, for instance, may cause the thickness and curvature of the cornea of your eye to increase slightly. It’s a small change, but it could affect how well your glasses or contacts correct your vision. During this time you may not want to invest in a new pair of eyeglasses or schedule a contact lens fitting. Most women who experience a change find that they’re a bit more nearsighted than they were before pregnancy – if you do experience vision changes during pregnancy, they’ll probably be minor.

Hormonal changes can also contribute to dry eye. It is important to keep your eyes hydrated during this time with re-wetting drops. Your vision may temporarily be blurred or less sharp due to dry eye and wearing contacts may irritate your eyes.

If you are pregnant, or thinking of becoming pregnant and are interested in LASIK you may want to consider this: Drs. Del Negro and Senft recommend that women have the procedure 6 months prior to becoming pregnant or 6 months after delivery or nursing.